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A news site about animals

Japanese Snow Monkey Babies

Are you ready the cutest, floofiest snow monkeys baby ever?! I wasn’t, I was totally taken aback unawares! OMG! I was weakened by their cuteness….. ahhhhh. There’s 8 minutes here of adorable snow monkey family hi-jinx from Monkey Island, Japan. I highly recommend 3:19.. the lil’ smile on that lil’ primate just melted my heart.

Thank-you YouTube Channel Kiyo for your wonderful snow monkey video (she has many more on her page)!

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://youtu.be/0S5ywmvcwWA

https://www.youtube.com/user/KiyoPhotography/featured

 

Capybaras Loose in Toronto!

At Toronto’s High Park Zoo, two capybaras, the world’s largest rodents, have escaped into the city. Despite being actually fairly massive, the partners in crime – actually named Bonnie and Clyde – have yet to be captured by authorities, who have spent the last three weeks(!) trying to hunt them down.

Source: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/capybaras-escaped-toronto-zoo-largest-rodent-on-earth/

They’ve settled into big city living well, and haven taken to Twitter to share their exploits. One of the escapees was caught in a trap, at one point, but was able to wiggle free. The pair of capybaras have occasionally been spotted by pedestrians but are, at present, still on the lam.

Source: http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/two-worlds-largest-rodents-run-toronto-zoo/

“Capybaras are pretty adaptive animals,” Luciano Verdade, a wildlife ecologist at the University of Sao Paolo in Brazil, told National Geographic. “Although they are relatively large animals, they can be deceptive in the proximity of humans.”

Source: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/capybaras-escaped-toronto-zoo-largest-rodent-on-earth/

They normally eat grasses native to their South American habitats, but they’re able to eat other vegetation. They can even switch between being active during the day and night, and they are semi-aquatic, which means they could evade capture by quickly diving deep underwater. The most immediate threat to the AWOL capybaras is dodging vehicles while crossing roads.

 

We’ll try to keep track of Bonnie & Clyde, Capybaras at large.

 

Happy Bunday (|^_^|)

 

http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and-animals/two-worlds-largest-rodents-run-toronto-zoo/

http://www.highparktoronto.com/zoo.php

https://twitter.com/torontocapybara

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2016/06/09/near-miss-as-capybara-slips-out-of-trap.html

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/06/capybaras-escaped-toronto-zoo-largest-rodent-on-earth/

 

The Cheetah & The Hyena

Safari guide, Onesmus Irungu, photographed an unusual scene on a morning out in Kenya’s Maasai Mara National Reserve: a spotted hyena getting chased off its kill by a mother cheetah and her three cubs.

These three snapshots maybe the first time that such behavior has ever been caught on camera, and they upend stubborn misconceptions about Africa’s carnivores.

Source: http://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/scavenger-switch-cheetah-family-steals-a-meal-from-a-spotted-hyena-photos

Source: http://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/scavenger-switch-cheetah-family-steals-a-meal-from-a-spotted-hyena-photos

Source: http://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/scavenger-switch-cheetah-family-steals-a-meal-from-a-spotted-hyena-photos

The hyena is often unfairly branded as nature’s cackling thieves and scavengers, but hyenas are actually very capable predators. Research suggests they kill up to 95% of the food they eat, and in this particular case, he had managed to take down a topi, one of Africa’s speediest antelopes.

Then, a female cheetah approached the carcass with her three 15-month-old cubs in tow. Outnumbered, the hyena had no choice but to abandon the topi, and the feline family ate for two hours.

Seeing the cheetah, famous for the high-speed chase, take the hyena’s food instead is surprising. ”Cheetahs have been seen stealing kills from other cheetahs, but to my knowledge there are no published reports of cheetahs actively stealing from any other predators,” says Femke Broekhuis, who, along with Irungu, described the event in a recent paper in the African Journal of Ecology.

 

When it comes to carcass theft, it’s usually the cheetahs who lose out. Their smaller size and mostly solitary habits make them vulnerable, and in some parts of Africa, more than 12% of their kills are commandeered by larger rival carnivores.

 

Such thieving tactics have earned lions and spotted hyenas a share of the blame for the serious decline in cheetah numbers, yet sightings like Irungu’s add to other evidence that these lithe spotted cats can cope with losing the occasional meal, and are flexible enough to adapt their behavior in order to survive. Scavenging, it turns out, might be one way they get by. Appropriating an unguarded carcass is one thing, but stealing it from a larger predator is a risky move, and it’s possible this cheetah mother took her chances because she had three extra mouths to feed.

 

For Broekhuis, who is the director of the Mara Cheetah Project in Nairobi, Kenya, the behavior helps us to see the predators in a different light. “Cheetahs are always portrayed as being very vulnerable, but the sighting of cheetah taking a kill from a hyena not only shows that they will scavenge, but also that they can confront other predators to obtain resources,” she says.

It also helps researchers tease out the real threats facing these cats, most of which can be linked to human activity: from habitat loss and disappearing prey to the illegal pet trade. ”Both lions and spotted hyenas are known to kill cheetahs and to steal their kills, but these three species have always coexisted and these interactions are all part of a natural system,” adds Broekhuis.

 

This might be the first time that a carcass-stealing cheetah has been caught on camera, but the team behind the Mara Cheetah Project hopes future observations will tell them whether it was more than just a fluke. The long-term project sees researchers tracking cats out in the field each day and recording their behavior.

“We currently have approximately 75 different cheetahs in our database, which allows us to follow individuals over time, so it is possible that we might observe this behavior again at some point,” Broekhuis says.

 

Happy Caturday =^_^=

 

http://www.earthtouchnews.com/natural-world/animal-behaviour/scavenger-switch-cheetah-family-steals-a-meal-from-a-spotted-hyena-photos

https://www.facebook.com/oleirungu

http://www.maasaimara.com/

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aje.12318

http://www.kenyawildlifetrust.org/predators/the-mara-cheetah-project

 

“Otter Almost Stole my GoPro”

Whilst trying to get some close up footage of the otters at Weymouth Sea Life Adventure Park, Lodmoor in Dorset of the United Kingdom, Andy Williams saw that “the otters became very interested and playful. I guess it’s not everyday they get a GoPro lowered into there enclosure! After jumping around and playing, one of them actually came very close to grabbing the GoPro off me! What lovely fun animals they are!”

Thank-you YouTube Channel Andy Williams for this wacky otter video. “Wacky” because the otters remind me of Whack-A-Mole! :-D

 

Happy Ottersday :#)

 

https://youtu.be/MnFLDwwNtsM

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfqYzqfYhJacGTMot18v_Bw

 http://www.sealifeweymouth.com/

 

The Notortoise BIG

Henry the Tortoise, known on Facebook as The Notortoise BIG , has become the most famous tortoise in New York City. Why? Because as he is pushed in a stroller to Central Park, for his daily outing, he turns more than a few heads.

Source: https://www.facebook.com/thenotortoisebig/

The 17 pound (7.7 kg) sulcata tortoise is the pet of 24-year-old Amanda Green who lives in the Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan. He led a reclusive existence until Green took to Craigslist to advertise for a tortoise walker.

New Yorkers are accustomed to dog walkers but no so much tortoise walkers, so Green expected only a few responses. Instead, the listing went viral and hundreds of people from all over the world applied for the $10-an-hour job.

“Just like a person who has a dog would hire a dog walker, I figured why not a tortoise walker?” Green said in an interview with Reuters TV. “It took on a life of its own … I heard from about 500,” said Green, a copywriter for a style and beauty website.

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-new-york-tortoise-idUSKCN0YB283

The job went to Amalia McCallister, who has experience from having worked in a pet store. “You honestly do have to keep your eye on him,” McCallister said, describing the job as fun and not too taxing. “I could, maybe, read a book, but you’ve got to make sure he doesn’t eat the wrong thing.”

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-new-york-tortoise-idUSKCN0YB283

Sulcata tortoises are native to north central Africa but they adapt well to different environments. Land-dwelling reptiles with a shell, they are mainly herbivores. Henry, who is taken to the park by stroller and then allowed to roam free, particularly likes dandelions and grass.

Source: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-new-york-tortoise-idUSKCN0YB283

He has amassed an online fanbase with more than 5,000 Instagram followers and over 400 likes on Facebook. The profile’s name is, of course, a play on the stage name used by the late rapper Christopher Wallace, who called himself The Notorious B.I.G.

 

Green adopted Henry a couple of years ago from a woman who was unable to manage her growing family and the tortoise. She said Henry is friendly and curious but needs lots of attention.

 

Green said she knows that Henry will one day outgrow her apartment. Male sulcata tortoises can reach a length of more than 30 inches (76 cm) and tip the scales at up to 200 pounds (90 kg).

“Am I going to somehow get a backyard in New York City?” Green asked. “These animals do need exercise so it is really great that I have a walker now.”

 

There’s some good “thinking outside of the shell”, Ms. Green.

 

Happy Humpday (^_^)

 

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-new-york-tortoise-idUSKCN0YB283

https://www.facebook.com/thenotortoisebig/

 

Tender Loving Chinchilla (That’s What TLC Stands For Right?)

I am weakened by the cuteness of this chinchilla, (known for their ultra-soft velvety fur) enjoying a nice grooming session with it’s human. I hope your weekend has been just as relaxing.

Thank-you YouTube Channel MangO for this video; it is a ding-dang-dorable!

 

Happy Bunday (|^_^|)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFUE77Rmh-o

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8X-2JKgWybITpkyu4WvYaA

 

The Wedding with 1000 Cats

It’s June, which means it’s officially wedding season! Now, at most weddings, the betrothed invite the people they care about most, but in this case, those people were cats.

Source: http://mashable.com/2016/05/19/cat-wedding/#53XQqJxfuGqP

Dominic Husson and Louise Véronneau both love cats, and so they wanted to celebrate their wedding with them. So, the couple from Montreal, Canada, flew to Parlier, California, near Fresno, to the Cat House on the Kings, a no-cage, no-kill cat sanctuary, where they performed a ceremony in front of about one thousand feline guests.

Source: http://www.revelist.com/animals/cat-sanctuary-wedding/2426/husson-and-vronneau-met-about-three-years-ago-according-to-love-meow-and-bonded-over-their-love-of-animals-especially-cats/2

“We are both animal lovers, and it shows she’s a great person, and that’s why I wanted to marry her,” Husson told NBC News.

Cat House on the Kings has been home to 24,000 cats and 7,000 over the past 24 years. Husson and Veronneau are the first couple to get married at the sanctuary.

Source: https://twitter.com/justinsacher/status/732648770937069568/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

The sanctuary’s founder, Lynea Lattanzio, said the cats responded very well to the bride and groom.

May this marriage blessed by kittehs, be a marriage that lasts to eternitehs.

Source: https://twitter.com/justinsacher/status/732746009487368192/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Happy Caturday =^_^=

 

http://mashable.com/2016/05/19/cat-wedding/#53XQqJxfuGqP

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/cat-loving-montreal-couple-married-alongside-1-100-cats-1.3587701

http://www.cathouseonthekings.com/

http://www.nbcnews.com/video/canadian-couple-has-purr-fect-wedding-at-cat-sanctuary-687728195636

https://twitter.com/justinsacher/status/732746009487368192/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/justinsacher/status/732648770937069568/photo/1?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

http://www.revelist.com/animals/cat-sanctuary-wedding/2426/husson-and-vronneau-met-about-three-years-ago-according-to-love-meow-and-bonded-over-their-love-of-animals-especially-cats/2