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A news site about animals

A Newly Discovered Monkey in Africa

In a paper published in the open-access journal Plos One, scientists describe the new monkey species that they call Cercopithecus Lomamiensis, known locally as the Lesula, whose home is deep in central DR Congo’s Lomami forest basin.  It is only the second discovery of a monkey species in 28 years.

 

“We never expected to find a new species there,” says John Hart, the lead scientist of the project, “but the Lomami basin is a very large block that has had very little exploration by biologists.”

New monkey's home territoryNew monkey’s home territory

Hart says that the rigorous scientific process to determine the new species started with a piece of luck, strong field teams, and an unlikely field sighting in a small forest town.

 

“Our Congolese field teams were on a routine stop in Opala,” says Hart, “it is the closest settlement of any kind to the area of forest we were working in.  The team came across a strange looking monkey tethered to a post. It was the pet of Georgette, the daughter of the local school director.  She adopted the young monkey when its mother was killed by a hunter in the forest. Her father said it was a Lesula, well-known to hunters in that part of the forest.”

The field team took pictures, showed them to Hart, who said, “right away I saw that this was something different. It looked a bit like a monkey from much further east, but the coloring was so different and the range was so different.”

What an exciting discovery…. it’s facial features are truly striking.

Happy Monkday.

 

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/12/world/africa/dr-congo-new-monkey/index.html

A New Baby Golden Brushtail Possum for Sydney

WILD LIFE Sydney, in Sydney, Australia, has a new baby Golden Brushtail Possum.  With her huge dark eyes, a little pink nose and a bright golden fluffy coat, Bailey, the zoo’s newest resident, is settling in as the exhibit’s golden child.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At six months old, Bailey had been kept under the watchful eye of the zoo’s curatorial team, away from public viewing during the first few crucial months of her development. With the team satisfied with her progress, the public are now able to catch a glimpse of Bailey’s adorable and rare features.

“Growing into her full fluffy golden coat, Bailey has developed exceptionally well since her birth on site at WILD LIFE Sydney. Bailey’s parents arrived to the attraction in 2008 and since then we’ve witnessed three successful Golden Brushtail Possum births with Bailey being the latest baby to join our young ever-growing brood of native Australian wildlife,” said Mike Drinkwater, Life Sciences Manager, WILD LIFE Sydney.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golden Brushtail Possums are one of Australia’s largest arboreal marsupials yet are rarely seen in the wild, being found mostly in small pockets of Tasmania. These brightly-colored, rare possums have been able to survive due to the lack of wild predators in Tasmania. Their unique appearance is result of low levels of melanin in their skin.

As the third Golden Brushtail Possum born at the attraction since 2008, the birth of Bailey is yet another testament to WILD LIFE Sydney’s breeding program.

 

http://www.zooborns.com/zooborns/2012/09/brushtail-baileys-baby-pics-emerge-a-zooborns-first.html

Bolivia Protects it’s Dolphins

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bolivian President Evo Morales has enacted a new law aimed at protecting the unique Bolivian pink river dolphins, known locally as bufeos, that live in the country’s Amazon rivers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The new legislation bans fishing freshwater pink dolphins and declares the species a national treasure.

At a ceremony along the shores of the Ibare river, President Morales called on the armed forces to protect the habitats of the pink dolphins.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-19642422

http://www.unique-southamerica-travel-experience.com/amazon-pink-river-dolphin.html

http://www.amazon-voyages.com/preparing_voyage/amazon_river_dolphins_rainforest_wildlife.html