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Japanese Snow Monkey Babies

Are you ready the cutest, floofiest snow monkeys baby ever?! I wasn’t, I was totally taken aback unawares! OMG! I was weakened by their cuteness….. ahhhhh. There’s 8 minutes here of adorable snow monkey family hi-jinx from Monkey Island, Japan. I highly recommend 3:19.. the lil’ smile on that lil’ primate just melted my heart.

Thank-you YouTube Channel Kiyo for your wonderful snow monkey video (she has many more on her page)!

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://youtu.be/0S5ywmvcwWA

https://www.youtube.com/user/KiyoPhotography/featured

 

Kipling’s Monkey Temple

I had the good fortune of seeing Disney’s new The Jungle Book this weekend, and it got me thinking, is there really a Indian forest temple that monkeys live in? It turns out, I was not the only one wondering this.

The Monkey Temple Jaipur. Source: https://www.tourmyindia.com/states/rajasthan/monkey-temple-jaipur.html

According to The Telegraph, Kipling actually never visited the Indian jungles depicted in The Jungle Book. The author was born in Bombay, but at age five, his family moved back to Britain. Later on, Kipling returned to India for seven years to work as a journalist, but he was based in Shimla, and far from Kanha and Pench national forests (the most Jungle Book-esque location in India).

The Swayambunath temple is perched on a few hills overlooking Kathandu. Source: http://www.theworldeffect.com/buddhist-temples-of-kathmandu

This hasn’t stopped people from searching for a similar Jungle Book setting, which recently led Taj Safaris in India to launch two travel experiences called “Mowgli’s Trails.” One takes place in Kanha National Park, while the other snakes its way through Pench National Park, both in the state of Madhya Pradesh. According to Travel Daily Media, the travel experience includes rides through the jungle to spot wildlife, visits to tribal villages, Jungle Book trivia, and stargazing.

Source: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bodyhorrors/2014/02/17/temple-monkeys-pathogens/#.VxU6Y_krIdU

No word on whether temple trips are included in the experience, but luckily, India has many temples to its name and quite a few are in Madhya Pradesh, and monkeys are easy to find there too.

 

Wild macaques lounging at an unknown Hindu temple. Image: Shutterstock. Source: http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bodyhorrors/2014/02/17/temple-monkeys-pathogens/#.VxU7FPkrIdU

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://www.romper.com/p/is-the-monkey-temple-in-the-jungle-book-a-real-place-travelers-are-itching-to-know-9038

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/travel/destinations/asia/india/articles/Rudyard-Kiplings-India/

http://www.mapsofindia.com/madhya-pradesh/temples-and-shrines.html

https://www.tourmyindia.com/states/rajasthan/monkey-temple-jaipur.html

http://www.theworldeffect.com/buddhist-temples-of-kathmandu

http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/bodyhorrors/2014/02/17/temple-monkeys-pathogens/#.VxU6Y_krIdU

http://thailandpackagetours.com/en/featured/the-annual-lopburi-monkey-banquet-festival.html

 

Even a Monkey Can’t Eat Just One

A couple on their honeymoon in Thailand wanted to make friends with a monkey; little did they know that even monkeys can’t resist the lure of the potato chip…

 

DISCLAIMER: In Otter News does not condone giving wild animals man-made food. Wild animals should only be eating food found out in the wild. That being said, this video is hilarious.

Thank-you YouTube Channel Funny Fails Funny Epic Fails Funny Videos Funny for this, well, funny video.

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://youtu.be/u0YpFWS0tyc

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUM9–FpToDwjTPl88jArlQ

 

Smallest Monkey Gives Birth to Tiny Twins

A pygmy marmoset, the world’s smallest monkey, just had twins- weighing 15 grams each- at the Symbio Wildlife Park in Helensburgh, New South Wales, Australia.

Gomez and Iti were introduced as a couple mid 2015. From the outset the two were inseparable, and now they get to both be first time parents to the cutest lil’ monkey babies I have ever seen. ^_^

Thank-you YouTube Channel Symbio Wildlife Park for the adorable video!

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=td0o_J_Pk-M

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWTyeZ_Ql9KgNWY_XJ3kzCQ

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-03-09/worlds-smallest-monkey-pygmy-marmoset-gives-birth-to-twins/7234046

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/03/07/cute-baby-marmosets-symbio_n_9405194.html

 

Squirrel Monkey Baby Boom

At the Auckland Zoo, in Auckland, New Zealand, there’s been a baby boom, with three squirrel monkey babies born in the last few weeks. Follow keeper Christine into the trees to see them in all their adorable furry glory. ^_^

Thank-you YouTube Channel Auckland Zoo for the wonderful video.

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

http://www.aucklandzoo.co.nz

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEGZq6RqgkU

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSuzKSW-jfnKqiQUuVF60Pw

 

Monkey Adopts Herself a Dog

A rhesus macaque monkey is having her 15 minutes of fame, after adopting a puppy, and raising him on the busy streets of New Delhi, India. She treats him like her own child: taking him wherever she goes, feeding him, and even protecting him from stray dogs, attesting to the strong nature of a mother’s instincts. This pair is truly adorable together.

Thanks to CCTV News for their video, and ZeeNews for breaking the story to the world.

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQbyCxwuoII

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RdGQASGGLiQ

Waltz of the Furries

It’s been twelve days since my last post.  I’m getting more and more comfortable living here in Maryland, especially with my roommates, who are becoming more like family everyday.  Here to demonstrate, are a kitteh, a doggeh, and a monkeh, who are just about the best of friends.  What Tchaikovsky’s Waltz of the Flowers has to do with them… I’m not sure, I just know that I like it. ^_^

 

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

Monkey See, Monkey Do, Monkey Own?

An argument is brewing between British photographer David Slater and the folks at Wikimedia over who owns the rights to a photo a black macaque monkey took with Slater’s equipment.  The website says the famous photo should be freely distributed, because it believes the animal’s self-portrait isn’t bound by copyright law.  The man who owns the camera equipment feels differently.

This 2011 image captured by a cheeky black macaque after turning the tables on a photographer who left his camera unmanned has ignited a debate over who owns the photo.

The dispute stems from 2011, when Slater’s wildlife photography field trip to Indonesia produced a striking image of a smiling crested black macaque; another image shows it holding the camera. The story went viral, with Slater explaining that a group of macaques had taken over his equipment for a bit during the three days he spent in their company.

 

As he told The Telegraph back then, ”one of them must have accidentally knocked the camera and set it off because the sound caused a bit of a frenzy.  At first there was a lot of grimacing with their teeth showing because it was probably the first time they had ever seen a reflection. They were quite mischievous jumping all over my equipment, and it looked like they were already posing for the camera when one hit the button.”

 

Slater added that the primates took hundreds of photos, most of them out of focus. By far the most famous of them was the grinning female macaque’s “selfie” that was then licensed for use by many media outlets.

 

The Telegraph gave us an update on the story this week, saying Wikimedia had refused to change the image’s open-copyright classification. Slater tells the newspaper that he went through a great deal of effort and money to get the photo, noting that he traveled to the area and set up the camera.

“That trip cost me about £2,000 for that monkey shot,” he says. “Not to mention the £5,000 of equipment I carried, the insurance, the computer stuff I used to process the images.”

 

The folks at Wikimedia don’t agree that Slater is the photo’s author, and they refused his request to remove the image from the Wikimedia Commons section for open-source material.

 

Perhaps you’re thinking that if Slater doesn’t own the photo’s copyright, then the monkey does. But as GigaOM reports, “the editors at Wikimedia (which manages the library of more than 22 million images and videos associated with the open-source encyclopedia) rejected the photographer’s demands because they believe that no one holds the copyright. A monkey can’t hold the rights to an image, or anything else, for that matter, because they aren’t human, and therefore don’t have the legal standing required to do so.”

 

Slater notes that a court case might be the only way to resolve the authorship and ownership issues. If that occurs, it’s unlikely that the macaque would be represented in the proceedings, or in the debate its brief career as a photographer has set off.

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/08/07/338668652/if-a-monkey-takes-a-photo-who-owns-the-copyright

Marmoset There’d be Genes Like These

A team of scientists from around the world led by Baylor College of Medicine in Waco, Texas, and Washington University in St. Louis. Missouri, has completed the genome sequence of the common marmoset, the first sequence of a New World Monkey, providing new information about the marmoset’s unique rapid reproductive system, physiology and growth, shedding new light on primate biology and evolution, and how they compare with humans.

Common marmoset. (Callithrix jacchus) Credit: Carmem A. Busko

The team published the work in the journal Nature Genetics. 

“We study primate genomes to get a better understanding of the biology of the species that are most closely related to humans,” said Dr. Jeffrey Rogers, associate professor in the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor and a lead author on the report. “The previous sequences of the great apes and macaques, which are very closely related to humans on the primate evolutionary tree, have provided remarkable new information about the evolutionary origins of the human genome and the processes involved.”

With the sequence of the marmoset, the team revealed for the first time the genome of a non-human primate in the New World monkeys, which represents a separate branch in the primate evolutionary tree that is more distant from humans than those whose genomes have been studied in detail before. The sequence allows researchers to broaden their ability to study the human genome and its history as revealed by comparison with other primates.

(Photo : REUTERS/Paul Hanna )

“Each new non-human primate genome adds to a deeper understanding of human biology,” said Dr. Richard Gibbs, director of the Human Genome Sequencing Center at Baylor and a principal investigator of the study.

The sequencing was conducted jointly by Baylor and Washington University and led by Dr. Kim Worley, professor in the Human Genome Sequencing Center, and Rogers at Baylor, and Drs. Richard K. Wilson, director, and Wesley Warren of The Genome Institute at Washington University, in collaboration with Dr. Suzette Tardif of The University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and the Southwest National Primate Research Center.

 

Happy Monkday :_)

 

https://www.bcm.edu/news/genome-sequencing/marmoset-sequence-primate-biology-evolution

http://phys.org/news/2014-07-marmoset-sequence-primate-biology-evolution.html