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Maryland Zoo Welcomes New River Otter

The Maryland Zoo welcomed a new North American river otter to the Otter Stream Habitat in the Maryland Wilderness Exhibit. He came to the zoo from the Oregon Zoo in Portland and his name is Hudson.

http://www.abc2news.com/news/region/baltimore-city/maryland-zoo-welcomes-new-young-otter-to-maryland-wilderness

“Hudson was somehow orphaned as an infant,” said Mike McClure, general curator at The Maryland Zoo in a statement. “He was found in June of 2015 walking alone along Highway 58 SE in Eugene, Oregon, which runs along the Middle Fork Willamette River.”

http://www.abc2news.com/news/region/baltimore-city/maryland-zoo-welcomes-new-young-otter-to-maryland-wilderness

He was cared for at the Chintimini Wildlife center before being moved to the Oregon Zoo. He came to the Maryland Zoo in March of this year and is now ready to meet the public.

http://www.abc2news.com/news/region/baltimore-city/maryland-zoo-welcomes-new-young-otter-to-maryland-wilderness

Hudson joins Piper, an otter the zoo received earlier this year, in the exhibit. The Maryland Zoo says the two otters get along well.

“Piper enjoys chasing Hudson and they are really interesting to watch together,” continued McClure. “They are both exploring every aspect of the stream habitat and seem to especially like popping out of the hollow tree trunk near the first viewing window to surprise guests.”

http://www.abc2news.com/news/region/baltimore-city/maryland-zoo-welcomes-new-young-otter-to-maryland-wilderness

Hudson and Piper can be seen together in the the river stream habitat in the morning. Mary, the Zoo’s older female river otter, prefers to be alone so she will alternate with them. You can see Mary in the afternoon.

Happy Ottersday :#)

http://www.abc2news.com/news/region/baltimore-city/maryland-zoo-welcomes-new-young-otter-to-maryland-wilderness

 

Celebrating Otter Day in New Mexico

In Albuquerque, New Mexico, more than 150 first graders celebrated Otter Day yesterday by learning more about the animals and their environment. The first graders went on a hike, scavenger hunts and took part in other activities focusing on ecology. Students celebrated the reintroduction of the river otter to New Mexico’s rivers.

 

Source: http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/legacy/publications/press_releases/documents/2008/101408otters.html

More than 60 years after they disappeared from their natural New Mexico habitat, river otters are thriving in the state once again.

“The last known wild, or native river otter was trapped and killed in the Gila River in the 1950s,” Rachel Conn said.

Conn is the projects director for Amigos Bravos, a water conservation group based in Taos. Amigos Bravos helped in creating New Mexico Friends of River Otters back in the early 2000s.

 

Source: http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/environment/article/6-wild-otters-released-into-New-Mexico-river-858690.php

The coalition’s goal was simple: get otters back into their natural habitat after pollution, deforestation and illegal trapping caused them to vanish from the state.

“[We] approached the Department of Game and Fish, their game commission, and advocated for a program to reintroduce river otters,” she said.

 

Source: http://wilderness.org/blog/best-recreation-new-rio-grande-del-norte-national-monument

Their plea worked. Between 2008 and 2010, 33 river otters were introduced into the Upper Rio Grande at the expense of $1,000 an otter. Since then, reported sightings were the only way the group knew how the otters were doing. That is, until this year.

“This year we initiated a new project, and that was our wildlife camera that we put out on the river in two places,” she said.

 

Source: http://www.desertusa.com/desert-animals/river-otter.html

Now there’s photographic proof that the otters are alive and well. Although there isn’t a way to track the population growth, Conn is confident that the otters are thriving and reproducing. Sightings of small otters have been reported.

“They’re a beautiful species, they’re at the top of the food chain, they provide critical, important functions to the rest of the ecosystem,” Conn said.

Otters can also help diminish the amount of invasive species in our area, like crayfish. “Otters love to eat crayfish,” she said.

 

Source: http://tucson.com/news/science/environment/nm-pulls-the-plug-on-gila-river-otters/article_3d05fc55-e3d7-570c-95c6-2e673564ae35.html

Happy Ottersday :#)

 

http://krqe.com/2016/04/20/student-learn-celebrate-otters-on-otter-day/

http://krqe.com/2016/03/27/wild-river-otters-thriving-in-new-mexico-rivers-again/

 http://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/legacy/publications/press_releases/documents/2008/101408otters.html

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/environment/article/6-wild-otters-released-into-New-Mexico-river-858690.php

http://wilderness.org/blog/best-recreation-new-rio-grande-del-norte-national-monument

http://www.desertusa.com/desert-animals/river-otter.html

http://tucson.com/news/science/environment/nm-pulls-the-plug-on-gila-river-otters/article_3d05fc55-e3d7-570c-95c6-2e673564ae35.html


Baby Otter Rescued in Florida makes New Home in Denver

Rescued near a gas station in Tampa, Florida, a baby North American river otter has made his way to Denver, Colorado: his new home.

The otter was first taken to a local Florida wildlife sanctuary,  Owl’s Nest Sanctuary for Wildlife, where he was named Oliver. After spending a few weeks there, Oliver arrived Friday at the Denver Downtown Aquarium, where he will live permanently.

Source: http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_29694901/baby-otter-pup-rescued-florida-makes-denver-aquarium

Oliver, who is about 11 weeks old, began his journey to Denver with Porter aboard a FedEx jet last week.  The blizzard in Denver forced the jet to ground in Memphis, where Oliver “received star treatment” at the FedEx world hub, with his own pool, and a shrimp and salmon dinner. When DIA reopened, Oliver was able to land safely.

Source: http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2016/03/29/otter-pup-rescued-florida-new-member-denver-aquarium/82375332/

The sanctuary determined that Oliver had become too accustomed to human interaction and it would be dangerous for him to be released back into the wild. Instead, it sought alternative options for his new home.

“Though it would have been ideal for him to be released in the Florida environment, I couldn’t have found a more spectacular home for an orphan that will always hold a place in my heart,” Kris Porter of the Owl’s Nest Sanctuary said in a news release Monday.

The Downtown Aquarium is accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and has two otters in existing exhibits.

Oliver’s familiarity with humans will allow the staff to continue to work hands-on with him. The aquarium hopes Oliver will later allow guests to interact with him so people can learn more about the threatened river otter species.

Source: http://www.kktv.com/news/headlines/Baby-Otter-Pup-Grounded-By-Last-Weeks-Blizzard-Makes-It-To-Denver-Aquarium-373852791.html

“Facilities like ours take pride in supporting conservation of wildlife through working with facilities like the Owl’s Nest Sanctuary for Wildlife, so we can give animals like Oliver a second chance to live out their lives and be ambassadors to their species,” said Jim Prappas, director of animal husbandry for Landry’s Inc., which owns the Denver aquarium.

Prappas said Oliver won’t be added to the exhibit officially for about a year and needs to be kept separate from the other otters until he is older.

“That kind of stuff isn’t always black and white. He’s still young,” Prappas said. “But he’s already doing great. He’s already up to his young antics and is eating and responding well to staff. He’s very bright, which makes this training process much easier.”

Source: http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_29694901/baby-otter-pup-rescued-florida-makes-denver-aquarium

Happy Ottersday :#)

 

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_29694901/baby-otter-pup-rescued-florida-makes-denver-aquarium

http://owlsnestsanctuaryforwildlife.com/

http://www.aquariumrestaurants.com/downtownaquariumdenver/

 http://www.kktv.com/news/headlines/Baby-Otter-Pup-Grounded-By-Last-Weeks-Blizzard-Makes-It-To-Denver-Aquarium-373852791.html

 

http://www.coloradoan.com/story/news/2016/03/29/otter-pup-rescued-florida-new-member-denver-aquarium/82375332/


Otters & Their Waters

Tomorrow, February 26, the Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium in Sarasota, Florida, is opening a brand new otter exhibit(!) called Otters & Their Waters.

 

The exhibit will feature North American river otters and provide an otter’s-eye view of their watershed homes. Watersheds- lands that drain water toward rivers, estuaries and the sea- are important to people and myriad wildlife, including river otters, their prey and many animals from land to the coastal oceans where Mote Marine Laboratory scientists carry out their research.

 

Visitors will see three otters- Huck, Jane, and Pippi- that were orphaned too young to survive alone and so were raised by wildlife rehabilitators. Mote’s animal care specialists will work with the otters and educate guests during narrated training sessions. Huck, Jane and Pippi are all too tame to be released, and they will serve as ambassadors for their watershed homes at Mote.

"Huck" (Source: https://mote.org/exhibits/details/coming-soon-otters-their-waters)

Huck was found in September 2015 by a veterinarian in Melbourne, Fla. He was 5 months old and appeared to have issues using his hind legs. He was people-friendly, suggesting he might have been hand-raised. He received a veterinary checkup, and within days his hind leg issues seemed to be gone.

"Jane" (Source: https://mote.org/exhibits/details/coming-soon-otters-their-waters)

Jane was rescued in spring 2015 and came to Mote from an animal rehabilitation facility in Conway, South Carolina. At the time of rescue, she was about 4-6 weeks old and weighed only about two pounds. She weighed ten pounds on arrival at Mote. Jane and Pippi, raised at the same facility, enjoyed a diet that started with Gatorade (a source of electrolytes) and otter formula. At 8-10 weeks, they were weaned on a protein-rich diet including scrambled eggs, ground turkey and more, then eating fish and crab meat, and ultimately, whole fresh fish. They learned to swim in a bathtub and then a larger pool. Jane is more dominant than Pippi and loves to play in her sandbox.

"Pippi" (Source: https://mote.org/exhibits/details/coming-soon-otters-their-waters)

Pippi was rescued in spring 2015 and came from the same Conway, S.C.-based facility as Jane. At the time of rescue, she was believed to be a week to 10 days younger than Jane and weighed 2.1 pounds. She weighed 7 pounds on arrival at Mote. Pippi is more shy and calm than Jane, with darker coloring around her face.

 

Please watch Mote’s web site and social media for upcoming announcements. Share your excitement with us by using #MoteOtters on social media.

 

Happy Ottersday :#)

 

https://mote.org/exhibits/details/coming-soon-otters-their-waters

http://ticket.heraldtribune.com/2016/02/23/otters-their-waters-at-mote-marine/

 

The Otters of Prospect Park

These three North American River Otter Pups, all male, were born in Brooklyn, NY, in February, and the triplets have just made their debut at Prospect Park Zoo, where they will help “educate people about the importance of keeping local waters and ecosystems in good health.”

The zoo breeds these otters as part of the Species Survival Program, and have created a naturalistic representation of their natural habitat on their Discovery Trail, where you can now go visit them.

Happy Ottersday :#)

 

http://gothamist.com/2014/07/18/river_otters.php